Courses

Arabic

ARAB 1010/1020 - Elementary Arabic

Introduction to the sound and writing systems of Arabic, including basic sentence structure and morphological patterns. A combination of the direct, audio-lingual, proficiency-based, and translation methods is used. The format consists of classroom discussions of a certain grammatical point followed by intensive practice.

Credits: 4

ARAB 2010/2020 - Intermediate Arabic

Prerequisites (for 2010): ARAB 1020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

Prerequisites (for 2020): ARAB 2010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

Continues training in modern standard Arabic, with emphasis on speaking, comprehension, writing, and reading. The method of teaching primarily follows the proficiency-based approach to language learning.

Credits: 4

ARAB 2250/2260 - Conversational Arabic

Introduces students to spoken Arabic, with oral production highly emphasized. Conversation based on everyday situations. enables communication with native speakers.

Credits: 3

ARAB 3010/3020 and ARAB 5010/5020 - Advanced Arabic I & II

Prerequisites: ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

The goal of this course is to increase the student's knowledge of the Arabic language and culture via a communicative-based approach, meaning that though the students will be expected to learn grammatical structures. Emphasis will be placed on the functional usage of the language and on communication in context.

Credits: 3

ARAB 3230/5230 - Arabic Conversation and Composition

Using a communicatively oriented, proficiency-based approach the course will focus on the communicative prodution skills (speaking and writing) in the language through a combination of interactive classroom activities, take-home assignments and group work. Emphasis will be on the development of these two skills. Students will also be introduced to aspects of the Arab culture to build cultural awareness and communicative competence.

Credits: 3

ARAB 3240/5240 - Arabic Arabic Conversation and Composition

Prerequisites: ARAB 3230 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

Develops oral and written proficiency to an advanced level of fluency, with emphasis on speaking and writing.

Credits: 3

ARAB 3672/6672 - Advanced Arabic Grammar

Prerequisites: ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

In this course students will develop a mastery of core items relevant to Modern Standard Arabic grammar, a mastery which will enable them to produce discreet, sophisticated sentences, as well as to compose paragraphs and essays, all while utilizing the grammar points covered in this class.

Credits: 3

ARAB 3810/5810 - Modern Arabic Fiction

Prerequisites: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

Students are introduced to twentieth-century Arabic fiction, and to the varied genres of prose including letters, memoirs, short stories, travelogues, and novels. Topics include autobiography, war and nation construction, fantasy, and political and sexual identity crises. Students become acquainted with different schools of modern Arabic literary criticism, and learn to analyze texts using critical analysis and specific theoretical terminology.

Credits: 3

ARAB 3559/5559 - New Course in Arabic

New Course in Arabic.

Credits: 3

ARAB 4010/4020 and ARAB 5410/5420 - Advanced Arabic III & IV

Prerequisites: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

The main goal at this stage is to reach a superior level of Modern Standard Arabic with due attention paid to all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing in addition to culture. Acquisition of more advanced grammatical structures will take place primarily through directed in-class drilling, coupled with an emphasis on the functional use of language through communication in context.

Credits: 3

ARAB 4120/7120 - Introduction to Arabic Drama

Prerequisites: ARAB 5830 or ARAB 5840, or instructor permission.

This course introduces students to modern Arabic drama from the early pioneers' period in the 20th century to the contemporary era. We will study different forms of this genre including: musicals, traditional, experimental, feminist, and social drama. Further, students become acquainted with different schools of modern Arabic literary criticism and learn to analyze dramatic texts using critical analysis and specific theoretical terminology.

Credits: 3

ARAB 4230/5230 - Love, War, and Diaspora in Hoda Barakat's Writings

In this course, we will examine the themes of love, war, and diaspora in the literature of the Lebanese writer, Hoda Barakat. Some of the topics that will interest us are: the role of the author as a witness to the Lebanese civil war, the challenges of rewriting history, recreating the homeland's image in diasporic locales, collective and individual memories and its role in trauma recall and testimony.

Credits: 3

ARAB 4245/5245 - Readings in Classical Arabic Prose

Students will gain insight and learn to appreciate some of the most influential "Arab" literary figures and some of the most celebrated classical Arabic prose masterpieces. Students will also broaden their critical and comparative perspectives with regard to some of the most important literary and cultural issues related to the overall poetics and politics of the Arabic-Islamic heritage.

Credits: 3

ARAB 4450 - The Other in Premodern Arabic Sources

Prerequisites: ARAB 3020 or instructor permission.

This course explores the unduly studied corpus of Arabic writings that describes the encounters with and perception of the Other. Much effort will be devoted to investigate medieval and early modern Arab-Muslim views of the Other in a cross-generic selection of non-religious Arabic prose such as travelogues, diplomatic memoirs, captivity reports, marvels, folktales, literary debates/boasting, and poetry.

Credits: 3

ARAB 4993/8993 - Independent Study in Arabic

Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

Independent study in Arabic.

Credits: 1-3

ARAB 5830 - Topics in Arabic Prose

Prerequisites: ARAB 3020/5020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

Emphasis on reading modern Arabic prose, and writing descriptive and narrative short essays.

Credits: 3

ARAB 5840 - Topics in Arabic Prose

Prerequisites: ARAB 5830 or instructor permission.

Exposure to selected reading material in modern Arabic prose, and writing of short essays, summaries, and descriptive pieces in Arabic.

Credits: 3

ARAB 5850 - Media Arabic

Prerequisites: ARAB 5530 and 5540, or ARAB 3010/5010 and 3020/5020, or instructor permission.

Examination of electronic (television and radio) and print (newspapers, magazines, periodic publications) Arabic.

Credits: 3

 

Arabic in Translation

ARTR 3245/5245 - Arabic Literary Delights

In this course, we will venture into the fascinating words and worlds of premodern Arab-Islamic leisure and pleasure. We will focus specifically on the literary representation of and socio-cultural/theosophical debate on humor, pleasantry, wit, frivolity, eating, feasting, banquets crashing, dietetics, erotology, aphrodisiacs, sexual education and hygiene.

Credits: 3

ARTR 3290/5290 - Exile/Return in Arabic Literature

Introduces the development and themes of modern Arabic literature (poetry, short stories, novels and plays). No knowledge of Arabic is required. Taught in English.

Credits: 3

ARTR 3350/5350 - Introduction to Arab Women's Literature

A comprehensive overview of contemporary Arab women's literature, this course examines all Arab women's literary genres starting from personal letters, memoirs, speeches, poetry, fiction, drama, to journalistic articles and interviews. Selected texts cover various geographic locales and theoretical perspectives. Special emphasis will be given to the issues of Arab female authorship, subjectivity theory, and to the question of Arab Feminism.

Credits: 3

ARTR 3490/5490 - Arab Cinemas

The course will concentrate on cinemas of Egypt, the Maghrib (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia) as well as Syrian and Palestinian films. It will examine major moments in the history of these cinemas and the political developments that have inevitably had a major influence on filmmaking in the region.

Credits: 3

ARTR 3559/5559 - New Course in Arabic in Translation

This course is meant to work with students on major works of Arabic literature in English translation.

Credits: 3

 

Hebrew

HEBR 1010/1020 - Introduction to Modern Hebrew

Prerequisites for 1020: Completion of Hebrew 1010 with a grade of C+ or better, or permission of the instructor.

An introduction to the pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and writing system of modern Israeli Hebrew. This course teaches students to understand and produce simple texts in Modern Hebrew through exposure to the Hebrew currently used in Israeli television, cinema, pop music, Internet, literature, and everyday conversation. Each lesson emphasizes all four skills – reading, listening comprehension, speaking, and writing – so students will feel comfortable to use their skills in the same manner. Class will be conducted in Hebrew, and the use of English by students will be discouraged. By the end of this sequence, students will have mastered the core grammatical principles of Hebrew, along with a basic vocabulary of 1000 words, and will be able to read and understand simple texts and carry out simple conversation.

* This course is open to anyone, even if the student has no background in Hebrew*

Credits: 4

HEBR 1410/1420 - Elementary Classical Hebrew

Studies the essentials of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Includes readings of narrative portions of the Hebrew Bible.

Credits: 3

HEBR 2010/2020 - Intermediate Modern Hebrew

Prerequisites for 2020: Completion of Hebrew 2010 with a grade of C+ or better, or permission of the instructor.

Continuation of the study of the fundamentals of grammar, with special attention to verb conjugation, noun declension, and syntactic structure, of modern Israeli Hebrew. This course teaches students to understand and produce texts in Modern Hebrew through exposure to the Hebrew currently used in Israeli television, cinema, pop music, Internet, literature, and everyday conversation. Each lesson emphasizes all four skills – reading, listening comprehension, speaking, and writing – so students will feel comfortable to use their skills in the same manner. This course will combine and broaden the grammatical structures and vocabulary studied at the Beginner level. Class will be conducted in Hebrew, and the use of English by students will be discouraged. By the end of this sequence, students will be familiar with the basic structure of the Hebrew language.

Credits: 4

HEBR 2410/2420 - Intermediate Classical Hebrew

Prerequisites: HEBR 1420 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

Readings in the prose narratives of the Hebrew Bible. Emphasizes grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. Attention to issues of translation and interpretation.

Credits: 3

HEBR 3010/3020 - Advanced Modern Hebrew

Prerequisites for 3020: Completion of Hebrew 3010, or equivalent, permission of the instructor

Continuation of the study of the fundamentals of grammar, with special attention to the conjugation of weak, or hollow, verbs, the passive form of all verb conjugations, and subordinate and adverbial clauses, of modern Israeli Hebrew This course teaches students to understand unaltered articles and produce passages in Modern Hebrew through exposure to the Hebrew currently used in Israeli television, cinema, pop music, Internet, literature, newspaper, and everyday conversation. Each lesson emphasizes all four skills – reading, listening comprehension, speaking, and writing – so students will feel comfortable to use their skills in the same manner. The course will combine and broaden the grammatical structures and vocabulary studied at the Lower Intermediate level. Class will be conducted in Hebrew, and the use of English by students will be discouraged. By the end of this sequence, students will be able to read texts in regular Hebrew and write on topics discussed in class.

Credits: 3

HEBR 4993/8993 - Independent Study in Hebrew

Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

Independent study for advanced students of Hebrew.

Credits: 1-3

Hindi

HIND 1010/1020 - Elementary Hindu-Urdu

Introductory training in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Hindi and Urdu.

Credits: 4

HIND 2010/2020 - Intermediate Hindi

Prerequisites: HIND 1020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

Introduction to various types of written and spoken Hindi; vocabulary building, idioms and problems of syntax; and conversation in Hindi.

Credits: 4

HIND 3010/3020 - Advanced Hindi Readings

Prerequisites: HIND 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

Readings are drawn from areas of particular interest to the students involved, and include readings from various disciplines.

Credits: 3

HIND 4993/8993 - Independent Study in Hindi

Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

Independent study in Hindi.

Credits: 1-3

 

Middle Eastern & South Asian

MESA 1000 - From Genghis Khan to Stalin: Invasions and Empires of Central Asia

Survey of Central Asian civilizations from the first to the twenty-first centuries, with particular emphasis on nomadism, invasions, conquests, and major religious-cultural developments.

Credits: 3

MESA 2110 - Intro to Middle East/South Asian Film History

"Transnational Circuits of Cinema: An Introduction to Middle East - South Asia Film History" - Since its very inception as a traveling fairground attraction, cinema has been a globally-circulating medium. This course begins in the moment of early cinema and proceeds through the contemporary moment, with a focus on Middle East - South Asia genealogies of filmmaking.

Credits: 3

MESA 2300 - Crossing Borders: Middle East and South Asia

A survey of the deep cultural, religious, political and economic historical relationship between the Middle East and South Asia, suggesting we need to understand the two "regions" comprehensively and comparatively.

Credits: 3

MESA 3110 - Sustainable Environments in the Middle East and South Asia

From arid cities to irrigated fields, hot deserts to high mountains, the Middle East and South Asia encompasses a range of environments for thinking through the relationships between nature and society, people and animals, human and nonhuman worlds.

Credits: 3

MESA 3111 - Film Festivals and Global Media Cultures: ME/SA Spotlight

With an emphasis on transnational film festival histories and collective media cultures in the Middle East and South Asia, this course offers a semester-long study of film festivals, as an intersection of historical and media industry approaches to cinema. Tie-ins will include comparative analyses of local film cultures and film festivals.

Credits: 3

MESA 3120/5120 - Classics of Islamic Literature: Islamic Mystical Writing

This course surveys the classics of Islamic mystical writing, spanning from the Middle East to South Asia and the Arabic, Persian, Urdu, and Indian vernacular languages. With an eye to both form and content, we will examine the literary productions - both poetry and prose - of some of the most influential Sufi figures in Islamic history, including Rabi`a, Ibn al-Farid, Rumi, Hafiz, Khusrow, Bulleh Shah, and others. Readings in English translation.

Credits: 3

MESA 3470 - Language and Culture in the Middle East

This course provides an introduction to the peoples, cultures, and histories of the Middle East through an examination of language-use. We focus on Israel/Palestine--and the contact between Hebrew and Arabic--as a microcosm for the region as a whole. Readings present ethnographic, linguistic, and literary perspectives on language, identity, and the general processes of SELF/OTHER constructions in contexts of political and military confrontation. Prerequisites: previous coursework in Anthropology, Linguistics, or Middle East Studies.

Credits: 3

MESA 4998 - Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies Senior Thesis I

Prerequisites: DMP major and instructor permission.

Thesis research under the direction of a MESALC faculty member serving as thesis advisor and a second faculty member serving as second reader. The second faculty member may be from outside MESALC.

Credits: 0

MESA 4999 - Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies Senior Thesis II

Prerequisites: DMP major and instructor permission.

Thesis composition under the direction of a MESALC faculty member serving as thesis advisor and a second faculty member serving as second reader. The second faculty member may be from outside MESALC.

Credits: 6

MESA 5110 - Transnational Circuits of Cinema, Middle East/South Asia Film History

This course begins in the era of early cinema and proceeds through the contemporary moment, with a focus on Middle East -- South Asia genealogies of filmmaking. Its emphasis remains on the quintessentially transnational histories (parallels, intersections, circuits) of these cinemas - e.g., the centrality of popular Egyptian cinema within the Arab world; the prolific circulation of Hindi cinema across and beyond South Asia.

Credits: 3

MESA 8995 - MA Research Seminar

Required course for all candidates for the Master of Arts in Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies. During this course the final paper, required for the MA, is written. Includes instruction in research methodology, data analysis and a history of academic research on these areas.

Credits: 3

MESA 8998 - Non-Topical Research, Preparation for MA Research

For master's research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.

Credits: 1-12

MESA 8999 - Non-Topical Research, MA

For master's thesis, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.

Credits: 1-12

Middle Eastern Studies

MEST 2270/5270 - Culture and Society of the Contemporary Arab Middle East

Introduces the cultural traits and patterns of contemporary Arab society based on scholarly research, recent field work, and personal experiences and observations in the Arab world. Taught in English; no knowledge of Arabic is required.

Credits: 3

MEST 2470 - Reflections of Exile: Jewish Languages and their Communities

Covers Jewish languages Yiddish, Judeo-Arabic, Ladino, and Hebrew from historical, linguistic, and literary perspectives. Explores the relations between communities and languages, the nature of diaspora, and the death and revival of languages. No prior knowledge of these languages is required. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 2470.

Credits: 3

MEST 2559 - New Course in Middle Eastern Studies

New Course in Middle Eastern Studies.

Credits: 3

MEST 3470 - Language and Cultures in the Middle East

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in anthropology, middle east studies, or linguistics, or instructor permission.

Introduction to peoples, languages, cultures and histories of the Middle East. Focuses on Israel/Palestine as a microcosm of important social processes-such as colonialism, nationalism, religious fundamentalism, and modernization-that affect the region as a whole. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 3470. 

Credits: 3

MEST 3559/5559 - New Course in Middle Eastern Studies

New Course in Middle Eastern Studies.

Credits: 3

MEST 4991 - Middle East Studies Seminar

Middle East Studies Capstone Seminar.

Credits: 3

Persian

PERS 1010/1020 - Elementary Persian

This course introduces students (both non-heritage and heritage learners) to the Persian language. While developing proficiency in reading, writing, comprehending, and speaking modern Persian through communicative methods, students acquire an understanding of grammar that is well integrated into their language usage.  Dialogs and reading texts are geared toward facilitating practical mastery of basic skills.

Credits: 4

PERS 2010/2020 - Intermediate Persian

Prerequisites: PERS 1020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

This course is a continuation of Introduction to Persian. After completing this course, students should be able to read authentic texts of various kinds (with the aid of a dictionary).  Although there is emphasis on rapidly improving reading comprehension and the course is much more grammar intensive than Elementary Persian, attaining greater proficiency in speaking, listening comprehension, and writing remains essential to successful completion of the course. Intermediate Persian prepares the student for in-depth textual study and analysis that will occur in the ensuing years of Persian study at UVA.

Credits: 4

PERS 3010/3020 - Advanced Persian

Prerequisites: PERS 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

The goal of this course is to increase student’s efficiency in reading modern texts; ranging from literary prose fiction to news media excerpts, to poetry. although the students will be expected to learn grammatical structures emphasis will be placed on the functional usage of the language and on communication in context.

Credits: 3

PERS 3240 - Introduction to Modern Persian Literature

This course addresses the development of modern(ist) trends in Persian literature, emphasizing historical and socio-political factors. Exemplar modern poems, stories, and essays are read in the original, then explained and critically evaluated. Defines and discusses significant ideas, ideologies, movements, trends, milieus, social backgrounds, etc., out of which modern Persian literature emerged.

Credits: 3

PERS 3559/5559 - New Course in Persian

This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Persian.

Credits: 3

PERS 4993/8993 - Independent Study in Persian

Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

Independent study for advanced students of Persian.

Credits: 1-3

PERS 5020 - Readings in Modern Persian Prose Fiction

This advanced Persian course is designed for students who have completed at least two years of Persian language study or the equivalent. As such, the primary aim of the course is to facilitate language acquisition. However, the assigned texts are also examined as literature in this class. PERS 3020 explores the development of modern Persian prose fiction and its relationship to a changing society. Course readings are comprised of writing by major contemporary authors.

Credits: 3

 
 

Persian in Translation

History of Iranian Literature

This course introduces the many stages of Persian literature historically. History of Iranian Literature is a study in the marriage of thought, milieu, genius, and multi-faceted poetics.

Introduction to Persian Sufism

This course introduces students to the many theoretical, literary, and philosophical aspects of Sufism in Iran. It is an introductory discourse into the lexicon and philosophy of Sufism in Iran and the Persian-speaking World.

Contemporary Persian Literature in Translation

This course examines the evolution of twentieth-century Persian prose by charting the development of two features that distinguish many modernist works in the Iranian context: 1) recourse to representations of western cultures as a means of social critique and/or self-appraisal; 2) transformation of “imported” western genres. Readings include works by several of Iran’s most prominent authors: Sadeq Hedayat, Jalal Al-e Ahmad, Simin Daneshvar, Goli Taraqqi, and Shahrnush Parsipur.

Iranian Women Writers

In the old and turbulent history of Iran, women have relied on words as their weapon of choice to struggle for peace and justice.  Their foremother, Scheherazade, knew the futility of fighting injustice with violence.  Like Scheherazade, Iranian women writers continue to find solace and strength in the limitless power of words. Since the mid-nineteenth century, Iranian women writers have desegregated a predominantly all-male literary tradition.  They have also been at the forefront of a bloodless social movement.  At home and in Diaspora, they have produced highly acclaimed bestsellers, touching the hearts and minds of an international reading public on an unprecedented scale.  This course studies this inspiring presence on the world stage through a variety of genre and, in particular, life narratives.

PETR 3322/5322 - The Life and Poetry of Forugh Farrokhzād

This course focuses on the life and art of Forugh Farrokhzad in a spectrum of genres that includes poetry, short stories, travel narratives, literary criticism, essays, and films by and about her. Although from the beginning of her literary career, Farrokhzad was a daring, often irreverent explorer of taboo topics, she was also deeply rooted in the Iranian culture. We study the body of her work to better understand the subversive nature of its subject matter, technique, or point of view, as well as its simple, unpretentious, and lucid language. We also examine the rhetoric and poetics of sex segregation, voice, choice, visibility, and mobility in order to gain a more coherent view of the social, political, and cultural realities of Iran in the 1950s and 60s.

Credits: 3

Sanskrit

SANS 1010 - Elementary Sanskrit I

An introduction to Sanskrit, focusing on the sounds, the writing system, grammar, the language's history, and the cultural background of the major texts in Sanskrit. The textbook is A.M. Ruppel's Cambridge Introduction to Sanskrit.

Credits: 3 (Fall Only)

SANS 1020 - Elementary Sanskrit II

A continuation of SANS 1010, this course takes the diligent student to the point of being able to read and understand easier Sanskrit texts.

Credits: 3 (Spring Only)

SANS 3012 - Selections from the Mahabharata

Prerequisites: SANS 1020

A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce students’ knowledge of grammar from SANS 1020, to expand vocabulary and to introduce the Mahābhārata, one of ancient India’s major epics.

Credits: 3 (Offered once every three years in the Fall)

SANS 3014 - Selections from the Ramayana of Valmiki

Prerequisites: SANS 1020

A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student’s knowledge of grammar from SANS 1020, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the Rāmāyaṇa of Vālmīki, one of the two major epics of ancient India, and the ‘first poem’ in Sanskrit.

Credits: 3 (Offered once every three years in the Fall)

SANS 3016 - Selections from the Kathasaritsagara of Somadeva

Prerequisites: SANS 1020

A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student’s knowledge of grammar from SANS 1020, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the Kathāsaritsāgara of Somadeva, the most important collection of story literature in Sanskrit.

Credits: 3 (Offered once every three years in the Fall)

SANS 3022 - Selections from the Bhagavadgita

Prerequisites: SANS 1020 and SANS 3012, 3014, or 3016.

A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce students’ knowledge of grammar from SANS 1020, to expand vocabulary and to introduce the Bhagavadgītā, a major religious text of ancient India.

Credits: 3 (Offerend once every three years in the Spring)

SANS 3024 - Selections from the Upanisads

Prerequisites: SANS 1020 and SANS 3012, 3014, or 3016.

A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce students’ knowledge of grammar from SANS 1020, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the Upaniṣads, major spiritual texts of ancient India.

Credits: 3 (Offered once every three years in the Spring)

SANS 3026 - Selections from the Puranas

Prerequisites: SANS 1020 and SANS 3012, 3014, or 3016.

A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student’s knowledge of grammar from SANS 1020, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the huge corpus of Puranic texts.

Credits: 3 (Offered once every three years in the Spring)

SANS 4993/8993 - Independent Study in Sanskrit

Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

This course is meant to give students training in advanced Sanskrit.

Credits: 1-3

 

South Asian Literature in Translation

SATR 2110 - Cultural Translation: Travel Writing in South Asia

Travel writing is among the oldest forms of literature, especially in Asia. This course explores depictions of the Indian sub-continent by travel writers from Buddhist pilgrims to Arab geographers to colonial and post-colonial writers.

Credits: 3

SATR 3000 - Women Writing in India & Pakistan: 1947-Present

Prerequisites: Completion of First Writing Requirement.

We will read and critique the fiction and poetry of culturally specific regions while reflecting on the assumption that experiences and identities are fundamentally gendered. We will explore issues associated with women writing in regional languages to writing in mainstream languages like Hindi, Urdu and English. We will also examine how the publication and dissemination of women's texts are related to the women movements in India and Pakistan.

Credits: 3

SATR 3110/5110 - Modern Urdu-Hindi Literature

This upper level course will comprise readings that will cover a broad spectrum of what constitutes the "modern" in Urdu and Hindi Literature. The course will track the historical beginning of Urdu-Hindi as a language, its development as a literary language and the complexities of the divide form one to two distinct languages: modern Hindi and modern Urdu.

Credits: 3

SATR 3300/7300 - Literature & Society in South Asia: Breaking the Cast(e)

Dalit literature is perhaps the most remarkable literary movement to emerge in post-independence India. It is the voice of the most marginalized section of India's population, those formerly known as untouchables. Until the advent of Dalit literature, the lives of Dalits had seldom been recorded in Indian literature. We will read fictional and non-fictional narratives of Dalit writers, and watch films to visualize and comprehend their lives.

Credits: 3

SATR 3559/5559 - New Course in South Asian Literature in Translation

New course in South Asian Literature in Translation.

Credits: 3

South Asian Studies

SAST 1600 - India in Global Perspective

The course will not be a conventional "introduction" to India which customarily emphasizes cultural history. Though there will be a short section at the beginning of the course that provides an overview of India's history, we will quickly move, after 6 class meetings, to the post-independence era, and focus in on the period since 1990, when India took steps to reform its economic policies and re-set its relationships with other world powers.

Credits: 3

SAST 2050 - Classics of Indian Literature

A survey of the foundational, formative and paradigmatic classic texts of the Indian Vedic, Buddhist, Jain, Hindu, Islamic and Sikh religio-literary-cultural traditions.

Credits: 3

SAST 2559 - New Course in South Asian Studies

New course in South Asian Studies.

Credits: 3

SAST 2800 - The World According to South Asia

This course approaches South Asia and its cultural diversity from the inside out, rather than from an `other' centered, western viewpoint. This course is not about the history of South Asia. It is about understanding the contemporary cultural milieu 'the world as seen reflexively and reflectively through a South Asian lens. We will be reading and discussing almost exclusively South Asian voices' opinions and perceptions.

Credits: 3

SAST 3300/5300 - The Pleasures of Bollywood: Melodrama, Realism, Mythos

This class will focus on cinema produced by the industry in Mumbai, popularly called Bollywood. Topics will include the relationship between fiction and documentation, between melodrama and realism, music and affect. Students will be taught the tools of film analysis and will be expected to watch and unpack films each week. They will also be expected to consider films in the social, political and economic contexts in which they were made.

Credits: 3

SAST 3559 - New Course in South Asian Studies

New course in South Asian Studies.

Credits: 3

SAST 3701/6701 - Business and Banking in South Asia

South Asia, the region which stretches from Afghanistan to Burma and down to Sri Lanka, has been the center of thousands of years of trade and finance. In this course we will investigate the early history of this vast flow through the following: the highlights of the history of business and banking, trade and finance from about 1500 B.C to the early European merchant adventurers , the worlds and cultures that were implicated in that history.

Credits: 3

SAST 4991 - South Asian Studies Capstone Seminar

This is the fourth-year capstone seminar for students majoring in South Asian Studies. This course will draw on the multidisciplinary interests of the students who participate to create a collaborative and collegial environment in which to investigate some of the foundational concepts and categories involved in the construction of "South Asia" as unified area of academic discourse.

Credits: 3

SAST 4559 - New Course in South Asian Studies

New course in South Asian Studies.

Credits: 3

SAST 5559 - New Course in South Asian Studies

New course in South Asian Studies.

Credits: 3

Urdu

URDU 2010/2020 - Intermediate Urdu

Prerequisites: HIND 1020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

Introduces various types of written and spoken Urdu; vocabulary building, idioms, and problems of syntax; and conversation.

Credits: 4

URDU 3010/3020 - Advanced Urdu

Prerequisites: URDU 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

This course is designed to expand and to consolidate the structures the student has learned through URDU 2020 by reading original Urdu texts, ranging from literary prose fiction to news media excerpts to poetry (both classical and modern). We will discuss these texts in Urdu in class, and the students will be responsible for a series of short essays throughout the semester in Urdu pertaining both to the texts and to other topics.

Credits: 3

URDU 3300/7300 - Readings in Urdu Poetry: An Ongoing Mahfil

Prerequisites: URDU 3010 or 3020; or HIND 3010 or 3020; or instructor permission.

This course will introduce advanced Urdu and Hindi students to some of the finest poetry in Urdu. Those who cannot read the Urdu script will have the option of reading the texts in Devanagari (the Hindi script). Some of the poets we will read are Mir, Ghalib, Dagh and Faiz. Course work will include brief analytical papers, as well as in-class presentations.

Credits: 3

URDU 4993/8993 - Independent Study in Urdu

Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

Independent Study in Urdu.

Credits: 1-3